Technical / research

Researchers develop method for more stable all-perovskite tandem solar cells

Researchers at The University of Toledo (UToledo), Northwestern University and University of Washington have focused on the stability of perovskite solar cells, and reported an adjustment to the chemical structure of a key component of a tandem cell that allows it to continuously generate electricity for more than 1,000 hours.

Image from Joule

“State-of-the-art all-perovskite tandem cells with a conventional hole-transfer layer can only continuously operate for hundreds of hours,” said Dr. Zhaoning Song, a co-author and assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at UToledo. “Our innovation prolongs the stability of these devices, advancing all-perovskite tandem technology and bringing it closer to practical application.”

Read the full story Posted: Jul 16,2024

Researchers show how inner doping of CNTs with perovskites can yield ultralow power transistors

As silicon-based transistors approach their limits, researchers are exploring alternative materials to continue progress in semiconductor technology. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered promising candidates for next-generation electronics due to their exceptional electrical properties and nanoscale dimensions. Yet, the challenge of precisely controlling the electronic characteristics of CNTs has hindered their widespread adoption in practical applications.

Researchers at China's Peking University, Zhejiang University and Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) have developed an inner doping method by filling CNTs with 1D halide perovskites to form a coaxial heterojunction, which enables a stable n-type field-effect transistor for constructing complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor electronics.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 15,2024

Researchers design efficient inverted perovskite solar cells using a synergistic bimolecular interlayer

A team of researchers, led by the Fudan University in China, has developed a p-i-n structure inverted perovskite solar cell that uses a synergistic bimolecular interlayer (SBI) and achieves what the team says is the smallest nonradiative recombination induced open-circuit voltage loss ever reported. 

Schematic illustration of p-i-n PSC using MPA/PEAI as SBI. Image from Nature Communications

The researchers' SBI strategy consisted of depositing 4-methoxyphenylphosphonic acid (MPA) and 2-phenylethylammonium iodide (PEAI) as modulators to functionalize the perovskite surface.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 13,2024

Researchers identify the potential of hexagonal perovskite oxides for next-gen protonic ceramic fuel cells

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Tohoku University have reported hexagonal perovskite-related oxides with exceptionally high proton conductivity and thermal stability. 

The team explained that these materials' unique crystal structure and large number of oxygen vacancies enable full hydration and high proton diffusion, making them ideal candidates as electrolytes for next-generation protonic ceramic fuel cells that can operate at intermediate temperatures without degradation.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 12,2024

Researchers show how 2D perovskitoids enhance stability in perovskite solar cells

Researchers from Northwestern University, University of Toronto and KAUST have hypothesized that perovskitoids, with robust organic-inorganic networks enabled by edge- and face-sharing, could impede ion migration. This addresses the issue of the migration of cations between 2D and 3D layers which results in the disruption of octahedral networks that leads to degradation in performance over time

The scientists explored a set of perovskitoids of varying dimensionality, and found that cation migration within perovskitoid/perovskite heterostructures was suppressed compared to the 2D/3D perovskite case. Increasing the dimensionality of perovskitoids improves charge transport when they are interfaced with 3D perovskite surfaces – the result of enhanced octahedral connectivity and out-of-plane orientation. 

Read the full story Posted: Jul 11,2024

Researchers develop efficient 2D Dion-Jacobson perovskite solar cell based on MXene contacts

Researchers at India's Chitkara University Institute of Engineering and Technology have developed 2D perovskite solar cells with MXene materials to build a PV device with remarkable efficiency and open-circuit voltage. The scientists claim the new cell architecture can help charge carriers move smoothly through the cell layers and reduce recombination losses.

The team's 2D DJ perovskite solar cell implemented bandgap grading techniques and use contacts based on a functionalized two-dimensional titanium carbide known as MXene. MXenes are compounds that take their name from their graphene-like morphology and are made via selective etching of certain atomic layers from a bulk crystal known as MAX. Recently, MXenes materials have shown promise for use in PV technology due to their unique optoelectronic properties, such as their large charge carrier mobility, excellent metallic conductivity, high optical transmittance, and tunable work function (WF).

Read the full story Posted: Jul 10,2024

Researchers use high-entropy hybrid perovskites to design efficient and stable perovskite solar cells

Researchers from China's Zhejiang University, Westlake University, Southern University of Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and University of California Los Angeles in the U.S have reported a family of high-entropy organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites for photovoltaic applications.  

The scientists built, for the first time, an inverted perovskite solar cell relying on a high-entropy hybrid perovskite material. The result is a device with an improved open-circuit voltage and fill factor, due to reduced non-radiative recombinations and optimized interface.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 07,2024

Researchers develop perovskite solar cells with improved performance using an organic electron-rich surface passivation layer

Researchers from Zhejiang University of Technology and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) have utilized two sulfone-based organic molecules known as diphenylsulfone (DPS) and 4,4′-dimethyldiphenylsulfone (DMPS) to passivate absorber defects in perovskite solar cells and improve their performance. As a result, the team reported a device with a higher electron cloud density at the interface between the perovskite material and the passivation layer.

The scientists used the molecules to improve charge distribution at the interface between the cell's perovskite absorber and the passivation layer, which reportedly creates electron-rich systems on the surface of perovskite. Using density functional theory (DFT) to compute a wide variety of properties of almost any kind of atomic system, they simulated the charge density distributions of the interactions of DPS and DMPS with formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI3) perovskite material.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 05,2024

Researchers demonstrate spin injection across chiral halide perovskite/III–V interfaces

Researchers from National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), University of Utah, Université de Lorraine CNRS and University of Colorado Boulder have improved upon their previous work, that included incorporating a perovskite layer that allowed the creation of a new type of polarized light-emitting diode (LED) that emits spin-controlled photons at room temperature without the use of magnetic fields or ferromagnetic contacts. In their latest work, they have gone a step further by integrating a III-V semiconductor optoelectronic structure with a chiral halide perovskite semiconductor. 

The team transformed an existing commercialized LED into one that also controls the spin of electrons. The results could provide a pathway toward transforming modern optoelectronics, a field that relies on the control of light and encompasses LEDs, solar cells, and telecommunications lasers, among other devices.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 04,2024

Researchers develop second-generation digital display with perovskite LEDs

Researchers from Zhejiang University, LinkZill Technology, Jilin University, and Linköping University have found that the electroluminescence rise time of perovskite LEDs (PeLEDs) can be reduced to microseconds using an individual-particle passivation strategy. This addresses a known issue with PeLEDs, that tend to have electroluminescence rise times over milliseconds due to ion migration in crystal structure, which is problematic for the development of high-refresh-rate displays.

The team demonstrated a second-generation digital display screen that uses perovskite light-emitting diodes instead of standard LED technology. In their study, the group made improvements to the device and demonstrated its sensing capability.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 04,2024